Simple Ways to Keep Your Dog Busy Indoors

Finding the time to fit in enough activity & exercise with your dog every day can be a challenge, especially when it’s crappy outside. Simple Ways to Keep Your Dog Busy Indoors!




But with some help from my dog we’ve come up with a big list of fun indoor games & activities to play indoors, and they’re prfect for rainy days. And the best part is the majority of these activities don’t require any special toys or equipment. Just you, your dog and a bit of creativity.

You Can Entertain Your Dog Without Destroying the House

Is your dog bored? Are you looking for simple ways to keep your dog entertained? Do you need to find a way to keep your dog busy while you’re at work? You can, and best of all you don’t have to destroy your home in the process.

Playing frisbee inside the kitchen is out, but there are lots of creative ways to keep your dog busy inside. Without giving our dogs something meaningful to do we find ourselves dealing with chewed up shoes, shredded newspapers, and a tables that no longer have legs. Bored dogs get into trouble, but luckily there’s some simple ways to keep your dog busy.

How to Keep Your Dog Busy (and out of trouble) Indoors

Remember that just because you’re stuck inside doesn’t mean the fun has to end. Trying to come up with ideas on how to keep your dog busy can be more exhausting than actually getting up and doing it.

So whether you’re looking for some So whether you’re looking for some fun games to play with your dog or just some easy ways to keep your dog busy try out some of these indoor activities with your pup. They’re a simple way to help keep your dog mentally and physically active, even when indoors.

How to play the which hand game with your dog:

  1. Place a treat in one of your hands.
  2. Close your fists and hold them out in front of your dog.
  3. Let the dog choose which hand it’s in.
  4. When your dog sniffs or paws the correct hand open it up and give them the treat.
  5. If he chooses incorrectly don’t discrouage him, it takes a few tries to catch on.
  6. A gentle “touch” command will be helpful.

Our dogs have excellent noses but they need to learn to utilize them. Just like us they’re used to relying on visual cues in their normal day to day activities. Simple nose work games help hone in their natural sniffing ability, and it’s a nice mental workout.

Chopped up carrots make excellent dog treats. We use them for scent work games and training. They’re low in calories, easy to prepare, and (most) dogs absolutely love them.




Play Hide and Seek With Your Dog

This is by far one of dogs favorite indoor games. Have your dog sit and wait while you go find a hiding spot. Call them once when you’re hidden and praise them enthusiastically when they find you.

Use the Stairs For a Workout

If you’re snowed in you might not have an opportunity to get in your regular amount of physical exercise with your dog. If you have stairs in your home utilize them. Have your dog follow along as you get in some exercise going up and down the stairs. If your dog isn’t clumsy you can also try playing fetch on the stairs.

Make a Scavenger Hunt or Play Find The Treats

Grab some smelly treats and have your dog stay while you go hide them around the house. Start with some easy hiding spots and work your way up once your dog is accustomed to using his nose.

Simple Ways to Keep Your Dog Busy Indoors

Fetch My Slippers/Paper

Dogs love having a job to do, even if it’s something as simple as fetching you your slippers. Make them feel extra useful by teaching them the names of some items you wouldn’t mind them retrieving for you. If you want to impress all of your friends teach your dog to fetch you something from the fridge. To make it easy on your dog tie a towel around the handle so it’s easy to pull open the door.

 Use a Stuffed Kong For a Nice Challenge

If you’d like to keep your dog busy with a toy for awhile stuff a Kong with something yummy. You can freeze peanut butter or broth, or just put some treats inside and give your dog something to work for. There’s a ton of dog safe options.

 Teach Your Dog The Names of Their Toys

Have you seen Chaser the Border Collie? She knows over 1,000 words and can pick out any given toy among 800 just by it’s name. We can’t all be overachievers like Chaser, but we can teach our dogs the names of their toys.

Start by playing with one specific toy and giving it a name while you do. After some practice & praise your dog will assign that verbal name with the chosen toy . Once your dog has learned that specific toys name you can test their skills by seeing if they can pick it out among their other toys.

Simple Ways to Keep Your Dog Busy Indoors

The “Go Find It” Game

Once your dog knows the names of some of their toys teach them the “go find it” game. Have your dogs toys in a pile or container and tell them to “go find” their favorite toy. Keep it fun for them by rewarding them handsomely with a treat or quick game of tug when they succeed. This game will give your dog a great mental workout.




Teach Your Dog a New Trick

Does your dog know how to weave through your legs and jump through a hoop? There’s always a new trick you can teach your dog.Once your dog knows a bunch of tricks step it up a notch and combine their learned behaviors into new tricks.

 Work on Clicker Training

If you don’t have a clicker I’d recommend picking one up next time you’re at the pet store. When training a dog every second matters; it’s so easy to miss the chance to communicate with our dogs the instant they do the behavior you desire. When you use a clicker you can mark the exact moment your dog made the right choice.

 Make Them Work for Their Food

We give our dogs a nice comfy life – they get a warm bed, lots of attention, and their meals for free. But our dogs were bred to work alongside us, many of our dogs are missing out on some mentally stimulating activities. One of the easiest ways to challenge their minds is to make them work for their meals. You can make your dog perform some tricks before he gets his dinner, or you can have them eat from a food dispensing toy.

 Play a Game of Fetch

Most of us do have some extra room indoors for a simple game of fetch, but if you live on the 5th floor with a St. Bernard you should probably skip this game. Hallways, stairways, and big living rooms are popular choices. My dog and I love playing soccer in the basement with her Jolly ball. Be careful with heavy toys around anything that’s fragile or able to be tipped over, and it’s probably not a good idea to play fetch inside the kitchen.

 Make a Doggie Play Date

Does your dog have some nice dog friends? Invite them over for some play time. It’s so satisfying to see dogs engaging in play with one another, and it’s pretty much guaranteed you’ll have one tired dog at the end of the day. You’ll also have a chance to catch up on some chores while the dogs create their own wrestle mania in your living room.

 Brush up on Some Old Dog Tricks

Just like us our dogs need a refresher now and then. When’s the last time you asked your dog to roll over or play dead? If it’s been awhile get out your clicker or treats and run through the drill. Have your dog practice all of their commands to make sure they’re not getting rusty.

 Keep Your Dog Happy and Busy with Interactive Play

Being indoors doesn’t have to be dull. Play some fun games with your dog or teach them something new. Dogs thrive with interactive play, it’s necessary for a dog’s health and well being. To keep your dog busy you don’t need a bunch of fancy toys or access to the outdoors, you just need a little bit of time and dedication.

We might not be able to provide them with the full time job they were bred for – but we can give them something meaningful to do with a few simple games and tricks. And when you look at your dogs happy face after a simple game of tug you’ll know exactly why dogs are mans best friend.




Source: Sketchy Sloth

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Cope with stickiness and extra moisture in the air by growing plants that reduce humidity indoors. They work!

Cope with stickiness and extra moisture in the air by growing plants that reduce humidity indoors. They work!  and skin clammy and the increase in humidity never let you feel better, planting these dehumidifying plants combined with other humidity reducing solutions can be a great idea. They’ll also clean your indoor air, helping you in having a restful sleep.




Xerophytes

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Xerophytes are the plants that can survive in deserts or ice, in low liquid water. They are known for their ability to live in harsh temperatures such as cacti and succulents. Aloes, euphorbias, some palms, and plants from Yucca family are good examples. These plants usually have hairy or waxy leaves and thick stems, with their help they can catch and keep water from the air and reduce humidity.

Epiphytes

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Epiphytes are plants that grow harmlessly on other plants or objects. As they get moisture and nutrients from the air around them, they are definitely the kinds of plants that reduce humidity indoors. Mosses, many ferns, cacti, bromeliads such as silver vase plant, orchids are the example.

Tillandsia

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors




As far as dehumidifying houseplants are concerned, tillandsia practically takes the cake. This tropical genus of ‘Air Plants‘ is the part of bromeliads family and is known to survive without soil and root systems by simply taking nutrients and moisture from the air itself.

Its showy thin scales aid in the entry of water while preventing its escape. Also, the silvery hue of the scales helps the plant stay cool by reflecting back a portion of the sunlight that falls on it.

A Few Other Houseplants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Peace Lily

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

A beautiful foliage plant with serene white spathes, peace lily is known to absorb moisture from the surrounding environment through its leaves despite being watered. Plus it is adept at removing traces of alcohol, acetone, benzene and other air pollutants.

Since it requires only a small amount of sunlight to thrive, peace lily is easy to grow indoors. Medium to low sunlight, watering, and an occasional dose of fertilizer are enough to keep this plant fresh and blooming.

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

A superb air dehumidifier, the Boston fern is an exotic plant with decorative leaves and slender arching fronds. It is also an effective air purifier plant and eliminates pesky air pollutants such as formaldehyde, xylene, and benzene, thereby precluding the onset of allergies and infections.

Boston ferns thrive best in warm and humid climate and prefer daytime temperatures, moist soil, and indirect sunlight. If you live in a colder region where the air dries out pretty quick, you may want to mist the plant occasionally to keep it healthy.




English Ivy

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

English Ivy is an evergreen perennial that is super easy to grow prized for its ability to cleanse the air of airborne molds and common air pollutants like formaldehyde. It is also known to scavenge off the moisture from the air to meet its own physiological needs.

Another advantage of this plant is that it can be grown in hanging planters too and placed at a higher elevation, maybe close to the ceiling, where it can absorb humidity as it rises. It performs best in cool temperatures.

Reed Palm

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

A hardy houseplant with mystical-looking foliage, the reed palm is one of those houseplants that offer more benefits with little to no maintenance. Unlike other palms, this one survives best in dim, indirect light, which makes it ideal for indoor growing.

However, when placed in a well-lit spot, it can grow tall and even survive prolonged exposure to the sun. Another interesting fact about reed palm is that it gets most of its water from the air, rather than from the soil.

By filtering the moisture out of the air, it helps reducing humidity levels in your home and prevents the colonization of pathogens and allergens.




Spider Plant

Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Spider plant has gained popularity as an indoor plant for being impressive-looking and low-maintenance. The gracefully arching leaves makes it look elegant, but that’s not all it offers. What makes it stand out is its ability to survive in low light and neglect. It also removes up to 90% of harmful formaldehyde in the air that surrounds it.




 

 

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Herbs normally have culinary, medicinal, and relaxation properties. As such, it can be great if you have a constant supply of them throughout the year. You can achieve this by growing some of the herbs in the kitchen.




Peppermint.

Just put fresh cuttings in water and give them enough light to grow and be healthy. Peppermint is great for cooking and medicinal purposes, so it’s a great addition to any indoor herb garden.

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Oregano.

Not only can you grow this all year long, but it’s great for flavoring pretty much any vegetable that you cook!

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Basil.

This herb is great for indoor growing because it loves a warm kitchen! Just put it in a container with water and give it plenty of sunlight!

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Sage.

Including growing indoor, make sure that it is in an aerated location because it can get mildew. Another great thing about this is that you only need a little bit of sage to get good
10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Stevia.

Add some sweet to your tea and other beverages with this herb! Keep them in a warm place and give as much light as possible to it so it can be strong and healthy!

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Lemon balm.

I think this herb is worth growing indoors just to get its great aroma in your house. But you can also use it in food and beverages for a nice addition!

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Tarragon.

The best way to grow this plant indoor is to take spring cuttings so the roots grow faster. There are different varieties of tarragon, so pick what you think is best.

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long





The cuttings you get from this should be green so that they grow the best. Thyme can dry out fast, so spray the part out of the water, if need be. It’s a great herb to keep around, though.

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Rosemary.

This herb can take a while to root, but it’s totally worth it! Rosemary actually makes for a great indoor plant and it has some great uses!

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long

Chives.

This herb is one of the easiest plants to grow indoor. They don’t need a lot of light and can grow with just a bunch from an existing plant and putting it in a pot with half-full of potting soil.

10 Herbs That Grow Indoors All Year Long



 

Grow Herbs Indoors During The Winter

During winter, you can grow herbs indoors to keep up your fresh herb supply. The best rooms are the kitchen or bathroom, as these stay slightly warm and humid through the winter months. Sow your herbs in pots and place them on a windowsill or in a place that catches the full benefit of any sun.

If sufficient warmth and light are a problem, you can place your indoor herbs under a fluorescent light or sun lamp, but don’t leave it on all the time, just for the recommended 4 to 6 hours a day.




To keep your herbs growing, just snip off the amount of leaves you need for the dish you are preparing. Your indoor winter herbs won’t be as lush as your outdoor summer garden produces, but they will give you the unrivalled flavour of fresh herbs.

The Best Herbs to Grow Indoors

  • Chives: Use in salads and sauces or with vegetables
  • Chocolate mint: Use in teas, soups, and salads.
  • Rosemary: Use with meat, especially lamb.
  • Oregano: Use for sauces, especially Italian cuisine.
  • Thyme: Use with fish and poultry.

Find the Perfect Pots

You will need to pot up some smallish-size herb plants, because the containers need to fit on a windowsill. 4-inch pots work nicely.

Remember to use pots with drainage holes so your herbs don’t rot. And that means the pots need to rest in saucers, which — if you are eyeing the width of your sill right now — should be a little wider than the pots. So you need at least a 5-inch windowsill. We like terra-cotta pots, but they do dry out quickly in winter’s heated indoor “weather,” and the saucers leak. Use a plastic liner or rubber pad.

How to Plant Indoor Herbs

1. Cover the drainage hole with a small square of window screening; then fill the bottom one-third or so of the pot with potting soil. Use the plastic nursery container (with the plant still in it) to check the soil level.

2. At this point, you can just pull the herb out of its original nursery container and place it on the soil. But here’s a neat trick: Put the herb — while it is still in its nursery container — in your windowsill pot, and fill with potting soil. You read that right: You now have a pot within a pot. It gets less confusing.

3. Press down the soil between the rims of the two pots with a thick dowel or your fingertips. Add more soil as needed. Do not press down the soil in the plastic nursery container.




4. Now carefully remove the nursery container (and plant) from your windowsill pot. There will remain a perfectly formed hole in the center of the terra-cotta pot. You probably already know what’s coming.

5. You take the herb out of the plastic nursery container and place it in the dark void at the center of your terra-cotta pot. It fits! Now water the soil and get growing.

Bring Outdoor Herbs In

Another way to start a winter herb garden indoors is to move plants from your garden into your kitchen.

You won’t want to uproot whole plants, because by this time of year they are far too large for just about any windowsill. And buying pots for huge herbs would offset any savings you might make by growing gargantuan greens indoors. What you want to save are pieces of the plant runners or divisions. Herbs like chives and mint divide easily; others require a bit more work.

However, since the plants at this point are basically freebies, you don’t need to concern yourself as much with what will make it through the dry-heat season indoors. If they die, they die, and you’ve had free fresh herbs out of season for however long it took those ill-fated herbs to sputter out.

Do not consider any such windowsill sputtering as a gardening failure. Consider it scientific experimentation and financial pioneering. Maybe you do want to try growing that basil indoors after all.

How to Transfer Outdoor Herbs

1. To transfer suitably-sized outdoor herbs to your windowsill pot, look for new growth.Some herbs can be divided. Others, such as this golden thyme, can be separated from the mother plant by inserting a trowel sharply just behind the newly-formed roots of an advancing stem.

2. Put the plant and root ball in a plastic bag to transport it back to your kitchen sink or potting table.

3. Pot it up, water thoroughly, and sharpen your scissors.




Grow Herbs Indoors During The Winter

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Cope with stickiness and extra moisture in the air by growing plants that reduce humidity indoors. They work!  If excess moisture in your home can make everything sticky and skin clammy and the increase in humidity never let you feel better, planting these dehumidifying plants combined with other humidity reducing solutions can be a great idea. They’ll also clean your indoor air, helping you in having a restful sleep.

Xerophytes

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Xerophytes are the plants that can survive in deserts or ice, in low liquid water. They are known for their ability to live in harsh temperatures such as cacti and succulents. Aloes, euphorbias, some palms, and plants from Yucca family are good examples. These plants usually have hairy or waxy leaves and thick stems, with their help they can catch and keep water from the air and reduce humidity.




Epiphytes

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Epiphytes are plants that grow harmlessly on other plants or objects. As they get moisture and nutrients from the air around them, they are definitely the kinds of plants that reduce humidity indoors. Mosses, many ferns, cacti, bromeliads such as silver vase plant, orchids are the example.

Tillandsia

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

As far as dehumidifying houseplants are concerned, tillandsia practically takes the cake. This tropical genus of ‘Air Plants‘ is the part of bromeliads family and is known to survive without soil and root systems by simply taking nutrients and moisture from the air itself. Its showy thin scales aid in the entry of water while preventing its escape. Also, the silvery hue of the scales helps the plant stay cool by reflecting back a portion of the sunlight that falls on it.




A Few Other Houseplants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Peace Lily

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

A beautiful foliage plant with serene white spathes, peace lily is known to absorb moisture from the surrounding environment through its leaves despite being watered. Plus it is adept at removing traces of alcohol, acetone, benzene and other air pollutants. Since it requires only a small amount of sunlight to thrive, peace lily is easy to grow indoors. Medium to low sunlight, watering, and an occasional dose of fertilizer are enough to keep this plant fresh and blooming.

Boston Fern

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

A superb air dehumidifier, the Boston fern is an exotic plant with decorative leaves and slender arching fronds. It is also an effective air purifier plant and eliminates pesky air pollutants such as formaldehyde, xylene, and benzene, thereby precluding the onset of allergies and infections. Boston ferns thrive best in warm and humid climate and prefer daytime temperatures, moist soil, and indirect sunlight. If you live in a colder region where the air dries out pretty quick, you may want to mist the plant occasionally to keep it healthy.




English Ivy

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

English Ivy is an evergreen perennial that is super easy to grow prized for its ability to cleanse the air of airborne molds and common air pollutants like formaldehyde. It is also known to scavenge off the moisture from the air to meet its own physiological needs. Another advantage of this plant is that it can be grown in hanging planters too and placed at a higher elevation, maybe close to the ceiling, where it can absorb humidity as it rises. It performs best in cool temperatures.

Reed Palm

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

A hardy houseplant with mystical-looking foliage, the reed palm is one of those houseplants that offer more benefits with little to no maintenance. Unlike other palms, this one survives best in dim, indirect light, which makes it ideal for indoor growing. However, when placed in a well-lit spot, it can grow tall and even survive prolonged exposure to the sun. Another interesting fact about reed palm is that it gets most of its water from the air, rather than from the soil. By filtering the moisture out of the air, it helps reducing humidity levels in your home and prevents the colonization of pathogens and allergens.

Spider Plant

Best Plants That Reduce Humidity Indoors

Spider plant has gained popularity as an indoor plant for being impressive-looking and low-maintenance. The gracefully arching leaves makes it look elegant, but that’s not all it offers. What makes it stand out is its ability to survive in low light and neglect. It also removes up to 90% of harmful formaldehyde in the air that surrounds it.